Mar 012012
 
Whooping Cough outbreak sickens over 140 people in Canada

A whooping cough outbreak in British Columbia, Canada has sickened more than 140 people since December, prompting Canadian Health authorities to issue a warning. Hotspots  include the Fraser Valley, Hope, Chilliwack and Agassiz areas. If you are traveling to the area make sure you have received your booster shot, and especially if traveling with children make sure they are up-to-date with their DTaP vaccine. Pertussis can be particularly dangerous if caught by a young child, especially a baby who hasn’t had a chance to be vaccinated yet. Related articles Whooping cough spreading in B.C.’s Fraser Valley (cbc.ca) Spread of whooping cough in Fraser ———->FULL ARTICLE

Sep 272011
 
American Academy of Pediatrics Updates Pertussis Booster Vaccine Guidelines

Pertussis, a.k.a. whooping cough is a nasty disease. It is particularly merciless with our youngest. Last year in California 10 babies died, of which 9 were under 2 months of age and were thus too young to be vaccinated with the first of the 5 doses of the DTaP vaccine. Thus, it is imperative that we do all we can to protect the youngest in our midst from this deadly disease. In line with this need for extra protection for our children, the American Academy of Pediatrics has updated its guidelines about the use of the pertussis booster (Tdap) vaccine. In light of ———->FULL ARTICLE

Jul 192010
 

READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE AT YAHOO NEWS NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – There is little need to worry about serious side effects if your toddler is getting vaccinated against whooping cough, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday. “Our findings provide reassuring evidence that the vaccine is not associated with acute seizure events and is safe for routine immunization in early childhood,” they write in the journal Pediatrics. An earlier version of the vaccine — which also protects against diphtheria and tetanus — had stoked concern, because it tripled the risk of fever-related ———->FULL ARTICLE